Tag: corporate

Big business, political strategy and corporate involvement in US state politics

<span class="caption">Protesters rally to have Colorado's then-incoming governor put an up-to-nine-month moratorium on oil and gas development.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/from-left-to-right-sandy-tolland-in-hat-miranda-glasbergen-news-photo/1076896552?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images">Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images</a></span>
Protesters rally to have Colorado’s then-incoming governor put an up-to-nine-month moratorium on oil and gas development. Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Political spending by corporations is big business.

As one corporate executive with experience in business-government relations says, “A company that is dependent on government that does not donate to politicians is engaging in corporate malpractice.”

Our research group heard that statement during a series of interviews with industry insiders that we conducted for a study on corporate political strategy and involvement in U.S state politics.

In the 2018 election cycle, for example, private interests spent US$500

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Why corporate America makes an unconvincing ally against racism

Amazon, Apple, McDonalds, JP Morgan – the biggest names in corporate America have all joined the global call for a reckoning on racial injustice in the wake of George Floyd’s brutal death at the hands of Minneapolis police last month.

Corporate donations to civil rights groups– at least $1.7bn by one estimate – have been accompanied by an outpouring of solidarity statements from the biggest names in fast food, finance and media.

Related: Brands are fighting to prove they are anti-racist – but is it enough?

Watching the news Marcia Chatelain, a provost’s distinguished associate professor of history at Georgetown

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Black corporate, nonprofit leaders say protests point to America’s racial wealth gap, offer solutions

Corporate and nonprofit leaders are echoing the anger, pain and frustration expressed by many Americans after the death of George Floyd, the 46-year-old black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25 after a white officer kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes.

On Monday several black leaders in business and finance voiced their reaction to CNBC over the incident, agreeing the unrest that has transpired across America over the past several days is a result of both racial injustice and racial disparity in income and wealth between African Americans and whites in the U.S.

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